45332
45332
+
arpeggia:

Gustav Klimt - Death and Life, 1916
+
trendytraveler:

Dale Frank, Europe Europe Who, 2012
+
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
nearlya:

Maggie Cardelús
+
keepmakingmore:

Person by Kate Anderson
+
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
devidsketchbook:

SCULPTOR JAVIER MARIN 
Javier Marin  was born in Uruapan, Michoacan, Mexico in 1962. He studied at San Carlos, the National Academy of Art, in Mexico City and has exhibited widely throughout Mexico with solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, MARCO in Monterrey, and the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. He has been featured in over thirty solo exhibitions and participated in more that one hundred domestic and international exhibitions including the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
+
contemporaryartdaily:

Nicole Eisenman at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
+
thirdorgan:

Ernst Neizvestny / Smoking Man (1968)
+
amorists:

Variations of Incomplete Open Cubes - Sol LeWitt
+
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Hsiao-Ron Cheng | hsiaoron on Tumblr (b.1986, Taiwan)
Taiwanese digital artist/illustrator Hsiao-Ron Cheng started to work as a freelance illustrator in 2012 and soon get international attention. In the same year, her work has been shortlisted for Young Illustrator Award. Hsiao-Ron’s clients range from fashion brand to design agencies worldwide. Other experiences include a digital painting of 8ft mural for a Sidney based coffee shop.
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Hsiao-Ron Cheng | artist found at septagonstudios]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Hsiao-Ron Cheng | hsiaoron on Tumblr (b.1986, Taiwan)
Taiwanese digital artist/illustrator Hsiao-Ron Cheng started to work as a freelance illustrator in 2012 and soon get international attention. In the same year, her work has been shortlisted for Young Illustrator Award. Hsiao-Ron’s clients range from fashion brand to design agencies worldwide. Other experiences include a digital painting of 8ft mural for a Sidney based coffee shop.
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Hsiao-Ron Cheng | artist found at septagonstudios]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Hsiao-Ron Cheng | hsiaoron on Tumblr (b.1986, Taiwan)
Taiwanese digital artist/illustrator Hsiao-Ron Cheng started to work as a freelance illustrator in 2012 and soon get international attention. In the same year, her work has been shortlisted for Young Illustrator Award. Hsiao-Ron’s clients range from fashion brand to design agencies worldwide. Other experiences include a digital painting of 8ft mural for a Sidney based coffee shop.
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Hsiao-Ron Cheng | artist found at septagonstudios]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Hsiao-Ron Cheng | hsiaoron on Tumblr (b.1986, Taiwan)
Taiwanese digital artist/illustrator Hsiao-Ron Cheng started to work as a freelance illustrator in 2012 and soon get international attention. In the same year, her work has been shortlisted for Young Illustrator Award. Hsiao-Ron’s clients range from fashion brand to design agencies worldwide. Other experiences include a digital painting of 8ft mural for a Sidney based coffee shop.
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Hsiao-Ron Cheng | artist found at septagonstudios]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr

Hsiao-Ron Cheng | hsiaoron on Tumblr (b.1986, Taiwan)
Taiwanese digital artist/illustrator Hsiao-Ron Cheng started to work as a freelance illustrator in 2012 and soon get international attention. In the same year, her work has been shortlisted for Young Illustrator Award. Hsiao-Ron’s clients range from fashion brand to design agencies worldwide. Other experiences include a digital painting of 8ft mural for a Sidney based coffee shop.
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Hsiao-Ron Cheng | artist found at septagonstudios]
+
somme:

Whyn Lewis
somme:

Whyn Lewis
somme:

Whyn Lewis
+
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
artchipel:

Artist on Tumblr
Aldo Tolino | ionoi on Tumblr (Australia)
Aldo Tolino is an Austrian artist who invests himself on paper objects and sculptures, manufactured, folded and photographed by himself. The folding techniques vary and so do the photographs; this is what makes the work interesting, as there are infinite number of permutations that will work for this purpose. The redundancy of the project is much like a philosophical argument, one that loops around and is at some point, unanswerable. Tolino is currently working on a book project “Interferenz”, which evolves around the topics paper, folding, image, object, sculpture, texture and recursion. (src. Artist’s biography & Beautiful Decay)
[more Aldo Tolino | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]
+
artchipel:

Matthieu Bourel | The Singing canary on Tumblr - Overview / Transfert (2013)
+
sfmoma:

#SubmissionFriday:
Bruna Massadas, Beach Day (Portrait Series), 2011-2014, acrylics on panel, 18 X 24 inches.
Website / Tumblr / Instagram
+
drawingdujour:

Drawing of the Day 332
D.B. Horowitz
+
artchipel:

Jacob van Loon (on Tumblr) & Chad Wys (on Tumblr)
(previously)
CW: How influenced are you by art history (less the academic discipline and more the evolution of artistic motifs and ideas throughout time)? 
JVL: I’m anchored to certain aesthetics from art history and aesthetics that come from certain disciplines. Allowing unrelated aesthetics to intermingle is my favorite challenge about creating new work. Something I think you can relate to.
CW: Are you personally invested in art theory or critical cultural theories? By extension, do you consider yourself a philosopher?
JVL: I can’t say I’m much of a reader, but when I come across something interesting I tend to pick it apart obsessively. The First Flowers are influenced by a single chapter of a Loren Eiseley book. What reading do you turn to if you want to foster new ideas? Do I come across as a philosopher? Do you? 
CW: I think a lot of us are philosophers! I don’t think some of us can help it. If we experience the world and digest those experiences I think we classify… not a terribly high bar, but I’m continuously surprised by the amount of people who can’t seem to think for themselves and for whom questioning their world is too inconvenient even to be tried.
I always turn to old ideas with fresh eyes. I’m lucky to have a somewhat hearty collection of art-related literature and picture books—most acquired at local library sales. Often I turn to those; sometimes I cut them up and use them in my work, but mostly I’m a reverent observer. The other day I began reading about Jacques Louis David, reigniting my love of his painting Death of Marat. I don’t know if that will translate into any new work for me, but he’s been on my mind ever since. David, a neoclassicist, worked with anachronistic historical themes and motifs, not altogether unlike myself. 
JVL: Some of my favorite art is figurative, because I think it takes nuance that I don’t have to successfully address the human figure in art.
CW: Agreed. I’ve never been much of a draftsman, and the human form is a beauty as well as a mystery to me. I guess that’s why I appropriate it so much. 
Speaking of artistic tradition, in your experience does the Internet compare to a traditional art gallery in terms of communicating your work to an audience? Do you think the nature of the display influences how your work is interpreted?
JVL: In some specific ways, the comparison between online and real life experiences is becoming more arbitrary. After gaining some momentum with an international audience online, it’s become clear to me that on some level I’ve bypassed conventional channels of promotion, with tangible results. I didn’t have to shop my work around from gallery to gallery, I’ve spent minimal amounts of time schmoozing and I’d like to think the time I spend online enhancing my network serves a higher social function. I don’t think my experience is unique. My approach to networking and promotion is undoubtedly how things now work in general, in and outside of the art world.
What I and many others who are concerned with the basic function of art still need is a tangible experience with art. Even as a predominantly 2-D graphic artist, the physicality of artwork is still a large consideration of mine. To see art on a screen will never be the same as being in a room full of art. 
CW: I’ve often thought that galleries and museums are not remotely replaceable, although in recent years I’ve begun to suspect they’re not entirely indispensable.
My work often exists in the physical world, but I see as much validity in the reproductions I share on the web. (Much of that has to do with the fact that my work explicitly grapples with reproducibility in the first place.) I’ve only ever observed your work online and I feel a strong connection to it. That causes one to wonder how the reception of artwork changes under different conditions of display—and there’s little doubt that it does.
There are inherent problems with the loss of materiality, and a lot of them, but I see contemporary art as increasingly transcending materiality; some might argue that art is practically post-optics at this point (ideas trumping form). I happen to think aesthetics are eminently important, but I see aesthetics transcending materiality, and I see aesthetics coming through loud and clear over the Web.
JVL: The internet changed how information is designed and consumed. Do you think art is more of a universal focus than it was before public access to digital platforms? “Disposable” comes to mind when I think of how fast information can move out of focus and past the cultural peripheral. There’s a kid nearby me right now thumbing through his Instagram feed and he spends less than a second looking at each picture. What’s he or anyone else actually taking in, especially when there’s material in and outside of art that needs more time to consume?
CW: I think it has been true for some time that people who care about considering art very deeply will do so in- or outside of a designated physical space. I don’t follow many blogs on Tumblr or many people on Instagram because I know the limits of my attention. I think the Internet improves access to all things (including art), thereby broadening the audience, but I think desensitization is a symptom of information-overload in general (at, or away from our devices). Sadly, I don’t know if that’s avoidable.
How we cope with choosing information is a deeply personal challenge. The Internet doesn’t change that, but, as you said, it does change access. I think you’re right: “disposable” is a great descriptor. Access to too much information at every moment has caused almost all of it to become disposable. How we look is more important than ever—I think where we look might be becoming less crucial.
(to be continued)
Chad Wys, Nocturne 109. c-print, 30”x23.25” (2011)Chad Wys, Nocturne 113. c-print, 30”x23” (2011)-Jacob van Loon, Homan Square. Watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel (2013)Jacob van Loon, The Moguls. (diptych) Watercolor and graphite on panel, 40x24” (2012)
[art discussion hosted by Artchipel]
artchipel:

Jacob van Loon (on Tumblr) & Chad Wys (on Tumblr)
(previously)
CW: How influenced are you by art history (less the academic discipline and more the evolution of artistic motifs and ideas throughout time)? 
JVL: I’m anchored to certain aesthetics from art history and aesthetics that come from certain disciplines. Allowing unrelated aesthetics to intermingle is my favorite challenge about creating new work. Something I think you can relate to.
CW: Are you personally invested in art theory or critical cultural theories? By extension, do you consider yourself a philosopher?
JVL: I can’t say I’m much of a reader, but when I come across something interesting I tend to pick it apart obsessively. The First Flowers are influenced by a single chapter of a Loren Eiseley book. What reading do you turn to if you want to foster new ideas? Do I come across as a philosopher? Do you? 
CW: I think a lot of us are philosophers! I don’t think some of us can help it. If we experience the world and digest those experiences I think we classify… not a terribly high bar, but I’m continuously surprised by the amount of people who can’t seem to think for themselves and for whom questioning their world is too inconvenient even to be tried.
I always turn to old ideas with fresh eyes. I’m lucky to have a somewhat hearty collection of art-related literature and picture books—most acquired at local library sales. Often I turn to those; sometimes I cut them up and use them in my work, but mostly I’m a reverent observer. The other day I began reading about Jacques Louis David, reigniting my love of his painting Death of Marat. I don’t know if that will translate into any new work for me, but he’s been on my mind ever since. David, a neoclassicist, worked with anachronistic historical themes and motifs, not altogether unlike myself. 
JVL: Some of my favorite art is figurative, because I think it takes nuance that I don’t have to successfully address the human figure in art.
CW: Agreed. I’ve never been much of a draftsman, and the human form is a beauty as well as a mystery to me. I guess that’s why I appropriate it so much. 
Speaking of artistic tradition, in your experience does the Internet compare to a traditional art gallery in terms of communicating your work to an audience? Do you think the nature of the display influences how your work is interpreted?
JVL: In some specific ways, the comparison between online and real life experiences is becoming more arbitrary. After gaining some momentum with an international audience online, it’s become clear to me that on some level I’ve bypassed conventional channels of promotion, with tangible results. I didn’t have to shop my work around from gallery to gallery, I’ve spent minimal amounts of time schmoozing and I’d like to think the time I spend online enhancing my network serves a higher social function. I don’t think my experience is unique. My approach to networking and promotion is undoubtedly how things now work in general, in and outside of the art world.
What I and many others who are concerned with the basic function of art still need is a tangible experience with art. Even as a predominantly 2-D graphic artist, the physicality of artwork is still a large consideration of mine. To see art on a screen will never be the same as being in a room full of art. 
CW: I’ve often thought that galleries and museums are not remotely replaceable, although in recent years I’ve begun to suspect they’re not entirely indispensable.
My work often exists in the physical world, but I see as much validity in the reproductions I share on the web. (Much of that has to do with the fact that my work explicitly grapples with reproducibility in the first place.) I’ve only ever observed your work online and I feel a strong connection to it. That causes one to wonder how the reception of artwork changes under different conditions of display—and there’s little doubt that it does.
There are inherent problems with the loss of materiality, and a lot of them, but I see contemporary art as increasingly transcending materiality; some might argue that art is practically post-optics at this point (ideas trumping form). I happen to think aesthetics are eminently important, but I see aesthetics transcending materiality, and I see aesthetics coming through loud and clear over the Web.
JVL: The internet changed how information is designed and consumed. Do you think art is more of a universal focus than it was before public access to digital platforms? “Disposable” comes to mind when I think of how fast information can move out of focus and past the cultural peripheral. There’s a kid nearby me right now thumbing through his Instagram feed and he spends less than a second looking at each picture. What’s he or anyone else actually taking in, especially when there’s material in and outside of art that needs more time to consume?
CW: I think it has been true for some time that people who care about considering art very deeply will do so in- or outside of a designated physical space. I don’t follow many blogs on Tumblr or many people on Instagram because I know the limits of my attention. I think the Internet improves access to all things (including art), thereby broadening the audience, but I think desensitization is a symptom of information-overload in general (at, or away from our devices). Sadly, I don’t know if that’s avoidable.
How we cope with choosing information is a deeply personal challenge. The Internet doesn’t change that, but, as you said, it does change access. I think you’re right: “disposable” is a great descriptor. Access to too much information at every moment has caused almost all of it to become disposable. How we look is more important than ever—I think where we look might be becoming less crucial.
(to be continued)
Chad Wys, Nocturne 109. c-print, 30”x23.25” (2011)Chad Wys, Nocturne 113. c-print, 30”x23” (2011)-Jacob van Loon, Homan Square. Watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel (2013)Jacob van Loon, The Moguls. (diptych) Watercolor and graphite on panel, 40x24” (2012)
[art discussion hosted by Artchipel]
artchipel:

Jacob van Loon (on Tumblr) & Chad Wys (on Tumblr)
(previously)
CW: How influenced are you by art history (less the academic discipline and more the evolution of artistic motifs and ideas throughout time)? 
JVL: I’m anchored to certain aesthetics from art history and aesthetics that come from certain disciplines. Allowing unrelated aesthetics to intermingle is my favorite challenge about creating new work. Something I think you can relate to.
CW: Are you personally invested in art theory or critical cultural theories? By extension, do you consider yourself a philosopher?
JVL: I can’t say I’m much of a reader, but when I come across something interesting I tend to pick it apart obsessively. The First Flowers are influenced by a single chapter of a Loren Eiseley book. What reading do you turn to if you want to foster new ideas? Do I come across as a philosopher? Do you? 
CW: I think a lot of us are philosophers! I don’t think some of us can help it. If we experience the world and digest those experiences I think we classify… not a terribly high bar, but I’m continuously surprised by the amount of people who can’t seem to think for themselves and for whom questioning their world is too inconvenient even to be tried.
I always turn to old ideas with fresh eyes. I’m lucky to have a somewhat hearty collection of art-related literature and picture books—most acquired at local library sales. Often I turn to those; sometimes I cut them up and use them in my work, but mostly I’m a reverent observer. The other day I began reading about Jacques Louis David, reigniting my love of his painting Death of Marat. I don’t know if that will translate into any new work for me, but he’s been on my mind ever since. David, a neoclassicist, worked with anachronistic historical themes and motifs, not altogether unlike myself. 
JVL: Some of my favorite art is figurative, because I think it takes nuance that I don’t have to successfully address the human figure in art.
CW: Agreed. I’ve never been much of a draftsman, and the human form is a beauty as well as a mystery to me. I guess that’s why I appropriate it so much. 
Speaking of artistic tradition, in your experience does the Internet compare to a traditional art gallery in terms of communicating your work to an audience? Do you think the nature of the display influences how your work is interpreted?
JVL: In some specific ways, the comparison between online and real life experiences is becoming more arbitrary. After gaining some momentum with an international audience online, it’s become clear to me that on some level I’ve bypassed conventional channels of promotion, with tangible results. I didn’t have to shop my work around from gallery to gallery, I’ve spent minimal amounts of time schmoozing and I’d like to think the time I spend online enhancing my network serves a higher social function. I don’t think my experience is unique. My approach to networking and promotion is undoubtedly how things now work in general, in and outside of the art world.
What I and many others who are concerned with the basic function of art still need is a tangible experience with art. Even as a predominantly 2-D graphic artist, the physicality of artwork is still a large consideration of mine. To see art on a screen will never be the same as being in a room full of art. 
CW: I’ve often thought that galleries and museums are not remotely replaceable, although in recent years I’ve begun to suspect they’re not entirely indispensable.
My work often exists in the physical world, but I see as much validity in the reproductions I share on the web. (Much of that has to do with the fact that my work explicitly grapples with reproducibility in the first place.) I’ve only ever observed your work online and I feel a strong connection to it. That causes one to wonder how the reception of artwork changes under different conditions of display—and there’s little doubt that it does.
There are inherent problems with the loss of materiality, and a lot of them, but I see contemporary art as increasingly transcending materiality; some might argue that art is practically post-optics at this point (ideas trumping form). I happen to think aesthetics are eminently important, but I see aesthetics transcending materiality, and I see aesthetics coming through loud and clear over the Web.
JVL: The internet changed how information is designed and consumed. Do you think art is more of a universal focus than it was before public access to digital platforms? “Disposable” comes to mind when I think of how fast information can move out of focus and past the cultural peripheral. There’s a kid nearby me right now thumbing through his Instagram feed and he spends less than a second looking at each picture. What’s he or anyone else actually taking in, especially when there’s material in and outside of art that needs more time to consume?
CW: I think it has been true for some time that people who care about considering art very deeply will do so in- or outside of a designated physical space. I don’t follow many blogs on Tumblr or many people on Instagram because I know the limits of my attention. I think the Internet improves access to all things (including art), thereby broadening the audience, but I think desensitization is a symptom of information-overload in general (at, or away from our devices). Sadly, I don’t know if that’s avoidable.
How we cope with choosing information is a deeply personal challenge. The Internet doesn’t change that, but, as you said, it does change access. I think you’re right: “disposable” is a great descriptor. Access to too much information at every moment has caused almost all of it to become disposable. How we look is more important than ever—I think where we look might be becoming less crucial.
(to be continued)
Chad Wys, Nocturne 109. c-print, 30”x23.25” (2011)Chad Wys, Nocturne 113. c-print, 30”x23” (2011)-Jacob van Loon, Homan Square. Watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel (2013)Jacob van Loon, The Moguls. (diptych) Watercolor and graphite on panel, 40x24” (2012)
[art discussion hosted by Artchipel]
artchipel:

Jacob van Loon (on Tumblr) & Chad Wys (on Tumblr)
(previously)
CW: How influenced are you by art history (less the academic discipline and more the evolution of artistic motifs and ideas throughout time)? 
JVL: I’m anchored to certain aesthetics from art history and aesthetics that come from certain disciplines. Allowing unrelated aesthetics to intermingle is my favorite challenge about creating new work. Something I think you can relate to.
CW: Are you personally invested in art theory or critical cultural theories? By extension, do you consider yourself a philosopher?
JVL: I can’t say I’m much of a reader, but when I come across something interesting I tend to pick it apart obsessively. The First Flowers are influenced by a single chapter of a Loren Eiseley book. What reading do you turn to if you want to foster new ideas? Do I come across as a philosopher? Do you? 
CW: I think a lot of us are philosophers! I don’t think some of us can help it. If we experience the world and digest those experiences I think we classify… not a terribly high bar, but I’m continuously surprised by the amount of people who can’t seem to think for themselves and for whom questioning their world is too inconvenient even to be tried.
I always turn to old ideas with fresh eyes. I’m lucky to have a somewhat hearty collection of art-related literature and picture books—most acquired at local library sales. Often I turn to those; sometimes I cut them up and use them in my work, but mostly I’m a reverent observer. The other day I began reading about Jacques Louis David, reigniting my love of his painting Death of Marat. I don’t know if that will translate into any new work for me, but he’s been on my mind ever since. David, a neoclassicist, worked with anachronistic historical themes and motifs, not altogether unlike myself. 
JVL: Some of my favorite art is figurative, because I think it takes nuance that I don’t have to successfully address the human figure in art.
CW: Agreed. I’ve never been much of a draftsman, and the human form is a beauty as well as a mystery to me. I guess that’s why I appropriate it so much. 
Speaking of artistic tradition, in your experience does the Internet compare to a traditional art gallery in terms of communicating your work to an audience? Do you think the nature of the display influences how your work is interpreted?
JVL: In some specific ways, the comparison between online and real life experiences is becoming more arbitrary. After gaining some momentum with an international audience online, it’s become clear to me that on some level I’ve bypassed conventional channels of promotion, with tangible results. I didn’t have to shop my work around from gallery to gallery, I’ve spent minimal amounts of time schmoozing and I’d like to think the time I spend online enhancing my network serves a higher social function. I don’t think my experience is unique. My approach to networking and promotion is undoubtedly how things now work in general, in and outside of the art world.
What I and many others who are concerned with the basic function of art still need is a tangible experience with art. Even as a predominantly 2-D graphic artist, the physicality of artwork is still a large consideration of mine. To see art on a screen will never be the same as being in a room full of art. 
CW: I’ve often thought that galleries and museums are not remotely replaceable, although in recent years I’ve begun to suspect they’re not entirely indispensable.
My work often exists in the physical world, but I see as much validity in the reproductions I share on the web. (Much of that has to do with the fact that my work explicitly grapples with reproducibility in the first place.) I’ve only ever observed your work online and I feel a strong connection to it. That causes one to wonder how the reception of artwork changes under different conditions of display—and there’s little doubt that it does.
There are inherent problems with the loss of materiality, and a lot of them, but I see contemporary art as increasingly transcending materiality; some might argue that art is practically post-optics at this point (ideas trumping form). I happen to think aesthetics are eminently important, but I see aesthetics transcending materiality, and I see aesthetics coming through loud and clear over the Web.
JVL: The internet changed how information is designed and consumed. Do you think art is more of a universal focus than it was before public access to digital platforms? “Disposable” comes to mind when I think of how fast information can move out of focus and past the cultural peripheral. There’s a kid nearby me right now thumbing through his Instagram feed and he spends less than a second looking at each picture. What’s he or anyone else actually taking in, especially when there’s material in and outside of art that needs more time to consume?
CW: I think it has been true for some time that people who care about considering art very deeply will do so in- or outside of a designated physical space. I don’t follow many blogs on Tumblr or many people on Instagram because I know the limits of my attention. I think the Internet improves access to all things (including art), thereby broadening the audience, but I think desensitization is a symptom of information-overload in general (at, or away from our devices). Sadly, I don’t know if that’s avoidable.
How we cope with choosing information is a deeply personal challenge. The Internet doesn’t change that, but, as you said, it does change access. I think you’re right: “disposable” is a great descriptor. Access to too much information at every moment has caused almost all of it to become disposable. How we look is more important than ever—I think where we look might be becoming less crucial.
(to be continued)
Chad Wys, Nocturne 109. c-print, 30”x23.25” (2011)Chad Wys, Nocturne 113. c-print, 30”x23” (2011)-Jacob van Loon, Homan Square. Watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel (2013)Jacob van Loon, The Moguls. (diptych) Watercolor and graphite on panel, 40x24” (2012)
[art discussion hosted by Artchipel]